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Agenda

Standard Items
VIRTUAL MEETING - LINK TO VIEW

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Also Present
MIN
ALSO PRESENT:
In accordance with paragraph 2.6(a) of the Constitution, Councillors Malcolm and Stafford addressed the Cabinet with regard to the following items: 

Item 07 - ICT Network Infrastructure - Contract (Councillor Malcolm) 
Item 12 – Budget Statement Report 2020/21 (Councillors Malcolm and Stafford) 
Item 13 - Gurnell Leisure Centre Update (Councillors Malcolm and Stafford)
Item 14 - Ealing COVID-19 Outbreak Prevention and Control Plan (Councillor Malcolm)
1 Apologies for Absence
MIN1
There were none.
2 Urgent Matters

The proper officer has determined that the following reports are urgent, pursuant to para. 15(1) of the Council’s Access to Information Procedure Rules.  This is because it was impractical for the reports to be published on the forward plan at least 28 days in advance of the date that it is to be considered by Cabinet.  The chair of Overview and Scrutiny Committee has been informed.

Item 12 - Budget Statement 2020-21

The reason for urgency is that it is vital that Cabinet understands  the Council’s financial position as a result of COVID19 and commissions work on a strategy in response.

Item 13 - Gurnell Leisure Centre Update

The reason for urgency is that due to Covid-19 it has become financially unviable to reopen the centre as originally proposed, and it is important that the decision on this is taken before government restrictions are lifted and the public expects the centre to reopen and to ensure that any potential staff impact is minimised.

Item 14 - Ealing’s COVID-19 Outbreak Prevention and Control Plan

The reason for lateness is that details of Ealing’s test and trace service support grant determination had only been provided very recently.  The reason for urgency is that delay in agreeing use of the grant will have a severely detrimental effect on the Public Health response to COVID within Ealing.

Item 15 - Street Naming Protocol Update and Proposal for Street Name Change

The reason for urgency is to enable this important topic to be addressed by the Council, in line with current high levels of public interest and concern.

MIN2
Resolved
That Cabinet notes:
The proper officer had determined that the following reports were urgent, pursuant to para. 15(1) of the Council’s Access to Information Procedure Rules

This was because it was impractical for the reports to be published on the forward plan at least 28 days in advance of the date that it was to be considered by Cabinet. The chair of Overview and Scrutiny Committee had been informed. 

Item 12 - Budget Statement 2020-21 The reason for urgency was that it was vital that Cabinet understood the Council’s financial position as a result of COVID19 and commissioned work on a strategy in response. 
Item 13 - Gurnell Leisure Centre Update The reason for urgency was that due to Covid-19 it had become financially unviable to reopen the centre as originally proposed, and it was important that the decision on this was taken before government restrictions were lifted and the public expected the centre to reopen and to ensure that any potential staff impact was minimised. 
Item 14 - Ealing’s COVID-19 Outbreak Prevention and Control Plan The reason for lateness was that details of Ealing’s test and trace service support grant determination had only been provided very recently. The reason for urgency was that delay in agreeing use of the grant would have a severely detrimental effect on the Public Health response to COVID within Ealing. 
Item 15 - Street Naming Protocol Update and Proposal for Street Name Change The reason for urgency was to enable this important topic to be addressed by the Council, in line with current high levels of public interest and concern.
3 Matters to be Considered in Private
Items 7 and 8 contain information that is exempt from disclosure by virtue of Paragraph 5 of Part 1 of; Schedule 12A of the Local Government Act 1972.

Items 9, 13 and 16 contain information that is exempt from; disclosure by virtue of Paragraph 3 of Part 1 of Schedule 12A of the Local Government Act 1972.

MIN3
Items 7, 8, 9, 13 and 16 contained confidential appendices but were not taken in private as it was not necessary to discuss the confidential information provided.
4 Declarations of Interest
MIN4
There were none.
5 Minutes
To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 16 June 2020.
MIN5
Resolved:
That the minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 16 June 2020 be agreed and signed as a true and correct record.
6 Appointments to Sub Committees and Outside Bodies

MIN6
Resolved
There were none.
Public Items
MIN7
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i) awards a direct call off from the sole supplier framework agreement between the Mayor and Burgesses of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and British Telecomm Plc to British Telecomm Plc for Network Infrastructure Services for £0.794m per annum for a duration of 5 years, to be fully funded from existing £3.798m ICT contracts register budget.

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
The current contract with London Grid for Learning, who currently provide Network Infrastructure and associated services, reaches the end of its 5-year term on the 28 of July 2021. Therefore, a new contract was required to replace it. The production of this report had been accelerated due to the impact of Covid 19 and the subsequent dramatic increase in remote working.

The advent of Covid-19 has caused significant changes in how staff had needed to operate their business activities. We were experiencing a ‘New Normal’ in terms of how society and the workforce functioned. This had placed new demands upon the infrastructure we used to provide, the required bandwidth for the services provided by the council, to its residents and customers. The way we delivered our IT services had already significantly changed and would continue to do so over the coming months.

In general, the work ICT had done to enable new ways of working had held up well to the challenges faced over the last few months. The solutions ICT had done, to allow for remote access, were sized to accommodate up to 50% of staff moving to homeworking, at any one time.  Proportionally, this had proved to be correctly designed and configured. However, the capacity of the solution was not designed to meet the current level of demand for homeworking. Perceval House was now operating at circa 5-12% of occupation, shifting much of the demand across different infrastructure.
MIN8
Resolved
That Cabinet: 
i) authorises a variation to the existing ‘Infrastructure Managed Services ICT Server and Storage Support’ contract between the Council and Microland Limited dated 17 May 2018 (“the Contract”) for full CRM platform implementation and support to deliver the Digital Programme, up to the value of £2.300M fully funded from existing budget (paragraph 4.3 of the report). 
ii) notes that at its meeting on 21 January 2020 Cabinet delegated authority to the Director ICT, IDM, & Property Services (CIO) in consultation with the Chief Finance Officer to extend Microland contract for a duration of 12 months from 1 June 2021. The variation requested here in will be included as part of the extension. 

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
At the Cabinet Meeting on 16 October 2018, Cabinet authorised the award of numerous contracts to deliver the Digital Programme. Delivered by several external partners, these contracts covered the key items identified in the business case, including:

Adoption and Change Management and implementation of Citizen Engagement with Microsoft Cloud.
Technical Platform Implementation 
Business Analyst Support, Change Management Support, and Implementation    Support

For Phases 2 and 3 the approach was to not use multiple suppliers but deliver all the above with a single supplier and Council’s own resources and expertise.

Key to delivering the remaining phases of the Digital Strategy would be to implement the original scope of the programme within budget. The Digital Strategy had completed the implementation of the minimum viable product and Revenue & Benefits processes on to the new platform. Based on the current spend profile it was deemed that we would not be able to complete the original scope intended if we progressed as was.

Review of current delivery of Digital Strategy identified that the best option to achieve the original scope of the project would be to:

Engage Microland to do CRM implementation and support for phase 2 and phase 3;
Microland had already been providing technical and delivery support for the Council’s Digital programme and would be best placed to continue with CRM implementation going forward;
The Council’s Digital Strategy was for Microland to implement activities from Phase 3 and beyond but with constraints on finances for the programme it was recommended that this be brought forward from Phase 2 onwards;
Microland would also be providing business analyst support for Phases 2 and 3;
Microland had provided a fixed cost per process. This would result in a move to more cost certainty and better value for money through cost-based outcomes;
The above approach would ensure a much more streamlined implementation with all services being delivered and supported by the same organisation;

Following consultation with the Commercial Hub, a variation to the Contract with Microland Limited which had been called off from the Crown Commercial Services G-Cloud framework was identified as the most cost-efficient procurement route as this: 

negated the need for consultancy services to oversee and project manage the tender process and minimised the need for evaluation, procurement and legal resources; 
option delivered the desired outcome in the shortest time as it provided an off-the-shelf solution without the need for: Invitation to Tender (ITT), Request for price (RFP), Request for quote (RFQ), request for information (RFI) or negotiation;
Framework was legally compliant and regulated and ensured minimal contractual risk; 
Framework provided transparency as the catalogue showcases the supplier’s service information and pricing.  It was therefore easy to ensure delivery of a solution that is best fit and the price provide value for money given that the framework was tendered.  
MIN9
Resolved
That Cabinet: 
i) approves the procurement of a single supplier for the provision of support and maintenance, managed service and hosting for a single, integrated Management Information System (MIS) for Education services by way of a mini competition through a suitable framework, such as the Crown Commercial Services G Cloud framework; for an initial 2 year period with an option to extend for a further 2 years. 
ii) delegates authority to the Executive Director, Children, Adults & Public Health, following consultation with the Portfolio Holders, to award the call off contract to the most advantageous tenderer if suitable tenders are received.

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
The education service areas included in the scope of this MIS procurement were: School Admissions, SEND (Special Educational Needs & Disability), Early Years, Education Welfare, Families Information Service, Pupil Services, Governor support, Exclusions, Information and ICT, Sensory and Physical Support. 

The current position was that each education service had commissioned its own module within the same system separately over time and there was no standard single contract or licensing agreement with the current provider. A new contract was required to ensure the continued support and development of the education services application. Reprocurement of a single contract offers the opportunity to achieve cost and service efficiencies and greater performance.  

Ealing currently operated a single, integrated MIS provided by Servelec Synergy. A single provider approach was proposed to continue and simplifies installation, upgrades, support and account management, while reducing complexity, integration, and  the need for onerous reporting and data matching systems. Overall this kept the total cost of ownership to a minimum.

The requirements document would seek interfaces with other key systems – Social Care (Mosaic), Youth Justice. The systems used by Ealing were currently also owned by Servelec.

The requirement of a hosted platform and managed service (away from council owned infrastructure) was in line with ICT strategy and addresses significant performance issues  experienced by all staff using the MIS working both remotely and from council offices. These performance issues had been extensively investigated and there was no local solution available. Other benefits were an improved level of support, easier upgrades and patching, automatic compliance for required machine capacity and less downtime for users. 
 
Procuring the service via a suitable framework, such as the Crown Commercial Services G cloud framework, was most likely to provide the most economically advantageous solution for this specialist product. 

Other options and their implications were set out below.

Continue existing SLA arrangements set out in 2.2 of the report: the  Council had limited influence to drive improved performance, system development,  achieving greater value for money. This also exposed the council to future risk of price increases.

Seek multiple suppliers/ systems: in some circumstances this could provide enhanced functionality for discrete service areas; however this increased both infrastructure and systems complexity for end users, complicated account and SLA management, would require expensive initial data migration and ongoing data management across systems.

The implications of a multiple supplier approach would be:
a) Each supplied system would require an interface to the central pupil database. Typically interface systems of these type were quoted at 20-30 days work at market rates of £800-£1000 / day. Each interface then needed support and maintenance – S&M market options were typically priced at 20% of development costs.
b) Multiple suppliers each requiring account management and monitoring of SLA agreements
c) Local management and coordination of material difficulties in fault management between suppliers
d) Additional internal resources needed to match records between systems accurately
e) In the set up and installation phase, data migrations required to populate different systems
f) External audits required for each system
g) Each system to have its own external security penetration test (approximately £4K per system).

Remain on council managed infrastructure: the Council would avoid the direct cost of a hosted service; however,  systems performance issues would continue to limit the impact on broader service improvements required, particularly affecting SEND and High Needs services, and may result in increased staffing and infrastructure requirements.
MIN10
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i) approves the direct award of contract to delivery partner who will act as management consultants, utilising the Crown Commercial Services’ G Cloud 11 (RM1557), or another Framework. 
ii) notes that the delivery partner will be a key partner in the service transformations by advising and co-ordinating with Servelec and ICT in deploying technical components in the service improvement plan and assist in resolving issues with the supplier for workflow, reporting, conversion and upgrades. 
iii) authorises the Executive Director of Children, Adults and Public Health, by way of delegated authority, following consultation with the portfolio holders, to access the CCS Framework Agreement for the purposes of ascertaining which services provider may be best suited for appointment as the delivery partner, and to award a contract to the service provider, in accordance with the rules of the framework agreement. 
iv) authorises the Executive Director of Children, Adults and Public Health, by way of delegated authority, to commission Servelec, by way of variation to the existing contract, to upgrade Mosaic and to provide a fully hosted service.

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
A contract already existed with Servelec and Ealing was initiating the hosting and conversion project as a variation under the existing contract; with a concomitant managed service version upgrade as part of achieving a fully hosted service. Servelec is the sole owner and provider of the Mosaic care management software system to Ealing Council.

Since the recent Ofsted inspection, Ealing Children’s Services had taken the opportunity to participate in the detailed review of the Mosaic product and had become satisfied that an upgrade to Mosaic, transfer of the full hosting functionality to Servelec and the appointment of a delivery partner, would achieve a number of Children’s Services targeted operational benefits in the improvement of social care practice recording and reporting as well as implementation cost savings by upgrading in collaboration and close proximity to Adults services plans. 

It was necessary for case management software systems to provide the required functional capabilities to enable, efficient management of caseloads and continuous improvement of social care practice case recording. The Mosaic upgrade would enhance key capabilities and add new functionality as an enabler to key practice initiatives. 

It was proposed that a delivery partner would be appointed to provide guidance, advice, resources, co-ordination and assistance in managing in the project deliverables.

The Mosaic care management reporting system helped to increase efficiency and gave social care professionals the time and data they needed to achieve more positive outcomes for service users. The proposal to have a single party with the relevant expertise responsible for looking after both the deployed application software components and supporting infrastructure would improve the service and create better accountability. 

There were a number of standard functionalities within Mosaic that would be switched on with an upgrade and which could offer a suite of improvements to its recording functionality. The current version allowed for the introduction of Group-Based working, providing Rich Text Fields and Due dates as part of the program. A further upgrade version would be required to take advantage of recommended functionality.

Ealing’s current version of Mosaic was 5.14 and could not be upgraded to version 5.15 or higher without completely replacing current hardware, operating system and Oracle database version. From a cost avoidance standpoint alone, having a hosted solution was desirable for the platform change that was proposed.

A significant concern in the recent Ofsted graded inspection report, related to significant gaps in the reports available to managers, especially front-line managers and the ongoing issues with the statutory returns, which ran from a customised local data warehouse.

The local Annex A Report in Mosaic was fed into the Children's Service Analysis Tool (ChAT), a tool produced by Ofsted, which worked well but there were issues extracting the data from the custom warehouse. The Annex A was now being used alongside other reports to create the monthly performance dashboards for managers. Annex A was a set of related datasets in Mosaic that is required by Ofsted.

A process would be developed to prioritise and specify how the new reports looked and a robust team of internal stakeholders and external contractors would be assembled to deliver these reports in a cogent manner.

To address the current deficiencies in the care management reporting system, it was recommended that a project would be initiated with a 15-month delivery timescale over Phase 1 and Phase 2. The work would need to commence in the next 6 months to ensure that it was completed in time to allow familiarity with the system for a period of time before the next Ofsted graded inspection which could be as early as autumn 2022. This left us with little to no time to get the above proposals and the upgrade instituted. 

Also, it was proposed that as part of the work that was suggested to be undertaken with Mosaic, that, all business processes would be duly reviewed, workshopped and updated, including the corresponding reporting tools.

The current Mosaic reporting had significant bottlenecks within it and a delivery partner would be in a position to support officers to manage this and other functionalities on behalf of the Council. This would also ensure that the known issues experienced with the recent Ofsted inspection were fully addressed. A programme to rebuild reports would be designed and implemented by a delivery partner, so that frontline teams would have the desired reports available more seamlessly. The program of report building would take into account any reports not able to be mapped by adopting the CLC configuration.

Ealing would upgrade from its current version as part of the managed service during the hosting move. Upgrade delivery could be expedited to the desired version.

Servelec was the owner and supplier of the Mosaic care management and reporting software, and the proposals would be included within the existing contract as a variation. There would be no requirement to tender this as there was no other organisation providing the proprietary Mosaic software. 

A delivery partner would be awarded the contract for their provision of services and management consultancy through a direct award, as an exception to the council’s contract procedure rules (CPR) or as a call off from the Crown Commercial Services for GCloud framework two (RM1557.11).
MIN11
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i) notes the General Fund revenue budget outturn position of £0.446m net overspend (0.18%) for 2019/20 funded from reserves (section 5 of the report), and a net surplus of £2.985m on the Housing Revenue Account for 2019/20 (section 7 of the report).
ii) notes the general fund balance as at 31 March 2020 of £15.919m and the total balance on earmarked reserves of £116.759m as at 31 March 2020 (section 6 of the report).
iii) notes that in accordance with the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) conditions and regulations, DSG balance being carried forward at the end of 31 March 2020 is a net deficit balance of £0.562m (section 7 of the report).
iv) notes the HRA balance at 31 March 2020 of £4.925m (section 8 of the report).
v) notes the progress on delivering the 2019/20 savings (section 9 of the report).
vi) notes the 2019/20 capital programme outturn variance of £1.297m net overspend (section 10 of the report).
vii) approves the re-profiling of 2019/20 capital programme net slippage of £17.308m (paragraph 10.3 and appendix 3 of the report) into future years.
viii) thanks the finance team and everyone across the Council for their efforts in making the outturn figure close to balancing.

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
The report outlined the council’s outturn position on revenue, capital, income and expenditure for 2019/20 and the consequent impact on Council’s financial reserves.
MIN12
Resolved
 That Cabinet:
i)   notes financial pressures arising from Covid-19 in 2020/21 were currently causing an estimated in-year budget pressure of £38.600m (section 5 of the report).
iii) notes and agrees the Spend Control Measures (section 4) to be implemented in-year to pursue, as far as possible, the delivery of a balanced budget (section 2 and 3 of the report).

Reason for Decision and Options Considered
The Covid-19 pandemic was bringing unprecedented challenges alongside some remarkable responses. This global health pandemic had seen Ealing Council act swiftly to support its residents, customer and businesses, working tirelessly to ensure that it could support the community with activities ranging from leading a pan London approach to procuring PPE, to food provision and support for the clinically vulnerable through to leading the way nationally in its distribution of grants and reliefs to over 5,000 businesses. As to be expected with such a crisis, this had unfortunately resulted in financial issues coming back to the fore that now required very careful consideration.

The scale of net pressure as a direct result of Covid-19 faced by Ealing was currently estimated to be £38.6m in 2020/21, the gross pressure was in excess of £64m.  The net pressure, as shown in section 5 of the report was made up of three main areas:
New expenditure incurred in relation to COVID-19 response
Budgeted income loss – including Council Tax and Business Rates 
Budget savings unable to be achieved 
The net pressure of £38.6m reflected the Council being allocated £26.1m of government grants relating to COVID-19 (paragraph 5.2 of the report), of which the Council was yet to receive £1.4m.

Councils were required to deliver a balanced budget each year ensuring that the projected expenditure and commitments could be matched by the available resources in year. As is to be expected, the new COVID-19 driven pressures, estimated as a result of the international health pandemic gave rise to a real challenge in the Council’s ability to achieve a balanced budget in the absence of further firm  and extensive funding commitments from Government.

The Council’s reserve balances had reduced year on year and whilst prudent and appropriate for the typical budgetary requirements and normal challenges faced by Ealing, they were not meant to nor have the capacity to deal with an international crisis on this scale, nor should reserves be fully depleted without very careful consideration of the impact on future years. As at 31 March 2020 the Council held £23.732m of un-ringfenced reserves, details of these were set out in the ‘Revenue and Capital Outturn 2019/20’ report being presented at the same meeting.
 
In response to this unprecedented challenge it was necessary for the Council to consider and implement a set of measures that look to deliver a balanced budget. However, the circumstances faced currently as a result of the pandemic were so remarkable in their breadth, scale and severity of impact across all financial areas that there was a very high likelihood that that such measures would not be sufficient to address the challenge, and that only a further announcement of Government adequate funding would allow this to be achieved.

Where the Council was unable to deliver a balanced budget, this would ultimately manifest into the s151 officer (Chief Finance Officer) to issue a s114 statement. A s114 statement was the gravest of financial sanctions and everything reasonably possible should be done to avoid it.
MIN13
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i)  notes the current position with regard to the redevelopment of Gurnell Leisure Centre as set out in paragraphs 2.2 to 2.12 in the report. 
ii) notes the unbudgeted costs of enabling the Gurnell Leisure Centre to open from mid-July until December 2020 in section 4 of the report.
iii) agrees that Gurnell Leisure Centre remains closed after the Government restrictions on leisure centre operations are lifted and note the estimated financial implications provided in section 4 of the report.
iv) notes that the position be reviewed as part of the Cabinet consideration of the redevelopment proposed which is expected to be in December 2020.

Reason for decision and Options Considered
The alternative options modelled were: 

1) The facility would reopen after the government restrictions were lifted and closed at the end of December 2020, with all operating costs covered.

2) The facility would reopen after the government restrictions were lifted and remain open indefinitely until the proposed redevelopment was implemented, with a supporting operating budget.
In the last report relating to the Gurnell Leisure Centre in September 2019 Cabinet members approved the revised proposals for the delivery of new leisure facilities on the basis that the Council itself should now take on the direct delivery of the new leisure facilities and affordable housing. This approval was subject to a further report being brought to Cabinet to seek authorisation to approve a final budget, appoint a contractor, proceed to construction of the new scheme, approve the final terms of a variation to the Agreement for Lease with  the Developer and a final decision on the proposed onward sale of units to Broadway Living or a subsidiary. Cabinet also agreed that the project should, in the meantime, progress to the planning phase and in particular that the Developer should shortly submit a planning application for the entire Gurnell scheme.
A planning application had now recently been submitted and officers were progressing the actions necessary to bring a report back to Cabinet for final approval of the scheme. It was now expected that this report would be brought to Cabinet in December.
As a result of the COVID19 pandemic all leisure facilities including Gurnell Leisure Centre were currently closed in line with Government guidelines. The financial projections included in the report had been calculated assuming facilities would reopen in July 2020.
Once leisure centres were permitted to reopen, it was not yet known what operational restrictions might apply, for example social distancing might mean that class capacities were reduced, therefore further impacting on income and number of users.
The facility at Gurnell had been operated by GLL on a contract extension, open book accounting arrangement since November 2018 to enable the facilities to remain open while the revised redevelopment proposals referred to above were progressed. As a result of the various delays to the redevelopment and uncertainty regarding the closure date, the customer base and income streams had fallen over the last 3 years with a 50% reduction in surplus payments to the Council for 2019/20.
Income and usage had been further impacted by the current COVID19 closure with no income or usage. This would move the Centre from a surplus to a subsidy position for 2020/21.
Analysis of projected income, expenditure and usage levels during the recovery period once Covid-19 restrictions were lifted until the earliest potential planned closure in December 2020 would require the Council to pay a significant management fee to the leisure operator.
Due to the proposal for redevelopment, there had been only essential spend on facility maintenance leading up to the closure date, resulting in a deterioration of the plant and building fabric.
If the facility was to be reopened, there would be repairs and maintenance works needed, associated with the Building Condition survey 2012, Roof and structural reports 2016-2020; these works were currently unbudgeted for in 2020/21.
Current usage levels had dropped significantly with current projections estimating a 50% reduction in use.
It was therefore proposed that the leisure centre should remain closed when the current restrictions were lifted and that the position be reviewed as part of the Cabinet consideration in December 2020. 
MIN14
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i) notes the application by the Director of Public Health to the Department for Health and Social Care for the test and trace service support grant.
ii) notes the Ealing COVID-19 prevention and outbreak control plan submitted to the Department of Health and Social Care (appendix 1 of the report). 
iii) delegates authority to the Director of Public Health, following consultation with the Portfolio Holder, to manage the test and trace service support grant of £2.262m awarded to LBE to mitigate against and manage local outbreaks of COVID-19 through the implementation of the Ealing COVID-19 prevention and outbreak control plan. 
iv) thanked Wendy Meredith (Director of Public Health) and the Public Health Officers for their work on the Plan.

Reason for decision and Options Considered
All local authorities in England were required to develop and implement a test, trace and outbreak control plan. It was a requirement that each plan would be submitted to the Department of Health and Social Care by the end of June 2020. The London Borough of Ealing (LBE) had developed the Ealing COVID- 19 prevention and outbreak control plan (appendix 1 of the report). 
All local authorties in England had been awarded a COVID-19 test and trace service support grant. The purpose of the grant was to support local authorities in England towards expenditure lawfully incurred in relation to the mitigation against and management of local outbreaks of COVID-19. The grant determination for LBE was £2.262m. 
Under the Council’s constitution authority for spend of over £1m required Cabinet approval. 
MIN15
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i)     notes the position regarding the council’s current Street Naming and Numbering Protocol.
ii) approves the updated Street Naming and Numbering protocol, attached as appendix 1 of the report.
iii) authorises the Director of ICT, IDM and Property Services (CIO) to take all and any decisions arising from or required to implement the Protocol. 
iv) authorises  the Director of ICT, IDM and Property Services (CIO), following consultation with the Leader and the portfolio holder for Business and Community Services and (in relation to the direct and associated costs of implementation) with the Chief Finance Officer, to begin consultation on the proposal to change the name of that part of Havelock Road Southall that runs between King Street and Merrick Road, to either Guru Nanak Road or Guru Nanak Way.
v) authorises the Director of ICT, IDM and Property Services (CIO), following consultation with the Leader and the portfolio holder for Business and Community Services, to consider the outcome of the consultation and to determine whether to implement the proposed street name change in consultation with the Portfolio Holder. 
vi) notes that the issue of whether to bring forward proposals to change the name of the remainder of Havelock Road Southall, will be addressed at a later date.
vii) notes that this report makes no recommendations in relation to the names of any other council properties or estates on Havelock Road, and that any proposals to change these will need to be addressed separately.
viii) notes that consideration is being given to whether a scrutiny panel will review the issue of diversity in the public realm and make recommendations back to cabinet in due course. 
ix) recognises the late Mr Dilmohan Bhasin (volunteer for ECVS and representative for the community on various NHS bodies) who had been instrumental in initiating this proposal for the street name change.

Reason for decision and Options Considered
The Council’s current guidelines on Street Naming and Numbering were adopted by Cabinet in October 2005.  Those Guidelines had remained substantially unchanged since then, and they were now overdue to be reviewed and updated.  For example, the current guidelines specified that “streets or pedestrian way names with historic connections should not be expunged”.  In the light of modern understanding, this sweeping statement was no longer appropriate.

The Mayor of London has recently (9 June) announced a new commission to review and improve diversity across London’s public realm.  The Mayor’s stated aim was to ensure the capital’s landmarks suitably reflected London’s achievements and diversity.  The Leader of Ealing Council had also announced that Ealing would have its own commission on the same theme but in relation to Ealing borough.  Against this background, it was sensible and appropriate that Ealing Council’s policies were updated.  The Street Naming and Numbering Protocol was the first step in this important exercise.

The proposal to change the name of part of Havelock Road Southall to either Guru Nanak Road or Guru Nanak Way arose from the wish to celebrate and commemorate the 551st anniversary of the birth of Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism (see appendix 3 of the report).
MIN16
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i)  awards a contract in the sum of £1,250,094.87 to Francis Construction Limited for the Havelock Primary School Additionally Resourced Provision (ARP) works to be funded from the existing approved Schools SEN Expansion Programme budget of £6.531m as set out in the Capital Programme 2019/20 to 2023/24.

Reason for decision and Options Considered
Cabinet authorised the Executive Director for Children, Adults and Public Health to invite and evaluate tenders for the main works contracts, and any enabling works contracts, required for the provision of the ARP at Havelock Primary School, on 15th October 2019.

Awarding the building contract for the Havelock Primary School ARP works would allow the Council to carry out its statutory duty of providing sufficient school places.
MIN17
Resolved
That Cabinet:
i) notes the latest position on delivering the target of 2,500 genuinely affordable homes (GAH).
ii) notes the projects currently within the approved GLA funding programme (the Programme) as set out in Table 1 at the end of the report and supports the proposed revised list of projects in Table 2 of the report (subject to GLA approval and officer decision as required).
iii) notes the options for delivery of the Programme as set out in paragraph 3.9.4 of the report and agrees that the schemes in the Programme should be delivered on the basis set out in paragraph 3.9.5 to 3.9.9 of the report namely that: 
a. Some housing delivery schemes should transfer to and be delivered by Broadway Living/ Broadway Living Registered Provider BL/BLRP and others should be retained by the Council and delivered by BL on the Council’s behalf.
b. Cabinet delegates authority to the Executive Director of Place to determine which schemes should be transferred to BL/BLRP and which schemes should be retained by the Council following consultation with the Portfolio Holder. 
iv) agrees, subject to approval of resolution iii) above: 
a. There should, subject to the outcome of a staff consultation and registration of BLRP as a Registered Provider (RP) and approval of a revised BL Business Plan, be a transfer of Housing Development and Regeneration team staff to BL to facilitate the delivery of schemes as outlined above. 
b. A TUPE consultation process be undertaken in September in relation to those staff it is proposed be transferred to BL on the basis set out in paragraph 11.1 to 11.8 of the report.
v) subject to registration of BLRP as an RP and approval of  a revised BL Business Plan to reflect the recommended options for delivery of the Programme referred to in  in resolution iii) above, delegates authority to Executive Director of Place (following consultation with the Chief Finance Officer and the Director of Legal & Democratic Services) to negotiate and authorise the Council to enter into:
a. Service level agreements for the Council to provide back office functions to BL and BLRP as set out in paragraph 3.10.2 of the report.
b. A service level agreement for BL to provide development related functions to BL/BLRP.
vi) agrees that future Council governance of the Programme and proposals for delivery by BL/BLRP shall be on the basis of the structures set out in paragraphs 3.11.31 and 3.11.32 of the report including the setting up of a Housing Delivery Sub-Committee.
vii) recommends to full Council that a Housing Delivery Sub-Committee be established as a sub-committee of Cabinet as recommended in paragraph 3.11.32 of the report.
ix) delegates authority to the Chief Executive (following consultation with the Chief Finance Officer and the Director of Legal & Democratic Services) to negotiate and authorise the Council to enter into a Shareholder Agreement or to approve amendments to BL’s Articles of Association as appropriate to reflect the governance arrangements as set out in Section 3.11 of the report.
x) notes the existing budget for the years 2019/20 to 2022/23 of £480k recurring revenue budget and an overall £6.0m capital budget within the Council’s capital programme.
xi) agrees to increase the 2020/21 budget allocation by £3m, from £1.6m to £4.6m, through re-profiling and bringing forward the existing capital budget allocation from future years 2021/22 of £2.0m and 2022/23 of £1m to ensure that the delivery of the GLA delivery Programme can be progressed (including those schemes identified in paragraphs 3.13.1. to 3.13.1.7 of the report) pending final approval of the proposals recommended in resolution iii) above.
xii) notes and agrees that each proposal to access the HRA capital funding allocation will require a financial review to assess financial viability and risk on scheme by scheme basis.
xiii) receives Bi-annual reports on the delivery of the HRA Business Plan, such reports to include details of how such schemes meet the Council’s overall investment criteria.
xiv) authorises the Director of Housing Development to invite and evaluate tenders or make a call off from a framework or a dynamic purchasing system and award a contract to an architect-led, multidisciplinary team to prepare and submit a detailed planning application (RIBA stages 1, 2, 3) for residential development on the Council’s Lexden Road site,  as described in para 3.13.1.1 of the report. 
xv) notes the proposals for the delivery of 8 schemes in the Programme as set out in paras 3.13.1.2 to 3.13.1.3 of the report (Package 1 and 3 and Northolt Grange CC) 
xvi) delegates authority to the Executive Director of Place to prepare and submit a detailed planning application for Package 1 and 3 and Northolt CC sites (RIBA stages 1, 2, 3) for residential development. 
xvii) notes the progress made to register BLRP as a Registered Provider set out in paras 3.12.7 to 3.12.11 of the report.
xviii) notes and supports the draft BL Growth Strategy which is intended to inform a revised BL Business Plan which will be submitted for consideration and approval by Cabinet later this year.
xix) thanks officers, for their work in achieving significant progress on this project.

Reason for decision and Options Considered
The Council approved setting up of a wholly owned subsidiary in October 2013 and incorporated a company, Broadway Living (BL), in March 2014 in order to progress the delivery of council housing and affordable housing in particular. This approval was considered in the light of a business case and options appraisal that were put together within the constraints of the then funding environment to tackle homelessness and housing pressures caused by the lack of good quality affordable rented homes to meet the needs of Ealing’s residents.

The Council had delegated authority to the Executive Director of Place in October 2018 to set up and register a new housing company Broadway Living Registered Provider (BLRP) to complement and supplement delivery of homes through its housing company Broadway Living (BL). 

In October 2018 the Council made a successful bid to the GLA for £99m of grant to support its ambitious target of delivering 2500 Genuinely Affordable Homes (GAH) by end of March 2022. The bid stated that the Council would deliver 1,138 GAH. Registered Providers were anticipated to deliver 1,362 GAH therefore making up the Council’s overall target of 2,500 genuinely affordable homes. Ealing’s current building programme represented a significant uplift its previous delivery of new homes. 

This report discussed the options the Council had for delivering the programme of house building, the Council’s commission to Broadway Living, the Council’s role as strategic client and also summarised the overall picture related to current progress delivering 2500 GAH.
18 Date of Next Meeting
The next meeting will be held on 15 September 2020.
MIN18
Resolved    
That Cabinet:
i) notes that the next meeting of Cabinet would be held on 15 September 2020 at 7pm
Exempt Items
7 Item 07 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 1 British Telecomm Plc Future Network Solution
  • Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings;
7 Item 07 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 2 Letter to LA CEOs NCSC Cyber Threat Assessment
  • Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings;
8 Item 08 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 1 Digital Programme Phase 2 and 3 Statement of Work
  • Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings;
8 Item 08 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 2
  • Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings;
9 Item 09 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix A
  • Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information);
13 Item 13 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 1 - Gurnell Leisure Centre Accounts
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13 Item 13 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix 2 - Financial Implications
  • Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information);
16 Item 16 - CONFIDENTIAL Appendix B - Havelock Tender Report
  • Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information);

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