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Meetings

Meeting Details

Council
19 Oct 2021 - 19:00 to 22:00
  • Documents
  • Attendance
  • Declarations of Interests
  • Visitors

Documents

Agenda

Standard Items
1 Apologies for Absence

To note any apologies for absence.

1

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors L Wall and Blacker.

 

The following Councillors were present virtually:

 

  • Dhindsa
  • Rai
  • Summers
  • Lusuardi
  • Martin
  • Kaur Dheer
  • Chohan
  • Sumner
  • Driscoll
  • Byrne
  • Murtagh
  • Dhadwal
  • P Anand
  • D Crawford
  • Tailor
  • Bell
  • Sahota
  • K Crawford
  • Burke
  • G Mann
  • Aslam
  • R Mann
  • R Wall
  • Woodroofe
  • Anjum
  • Dheer

 

2 Matters to be Considered in Private

To determine whether items contain information that is exempt from disclosure by virtue of Part 1 of Schedule 12A of the Local Government Act 1972.

2

RESOLVED: That all matters be considered in public, as proposed.

 

3 Declarations of Interest

To note any declarations of interest made by members.

3

Cllr Raza declared she had an interest in item 6, public petiton for debate, as she was a trustee for the Young Ealing Foundation. However this was a non pecuniary interest so she intended to remain in the room during consideration of the item.

 

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 20 July 2021.

 

4

RESOLVED: That, subject to the addition of Councillor Gallant being added to the attendance list, the minutes of the meeting held on 20 July 2021 are agreed as a correct record of the meeting.

 

5 Mayor's Announcements
5

The Mayor paid tribute to former Councillor Eleri Ebeneezer, who had passed away in August 2021 aged 73, as well as David Amess MP who had been murdered during a constituency surgery in Southend. Representatives from all three political groups on the Council gave speeches reflecting on the lives of Eleri Ebeneezer and David Amess and Council observed a minute's silence.

 

Councillor Claire Tighe was welcomed to her first Council meeting following her election to Hobbayne Ward in a by-election in September.

 

The Mayor thanked all who had supported his chosen charity - Homestart Ealing - by attending his fundraising events.

 

The Mayor congratulated all who had completed the Ealing Marathon, and wished everyone in the Borough a happy Black History Month.

 

 

6 Public Petition for Debate

A debate petition has been submitted under Rule 9.3 of the Constitution.

The petition had the following wording:

 

Prevent the closure of the Young Adults Centre, protect it from demolition and keep it as the safe space the young people of Southall deserve.

In the borough of Ealing, there are only 3 purpose-built youth centres. In the area of Southall there are over 16,000 young people, many of whom rely on the Young Adults Centre (YAC) as their source of social interaction as well as it being a hub for extracurricular sport and clubs. If Ealing council close the YAC, a certain demographic of young people, living in an already disadvantaged area, will suffer more due to the lack of social interaction. The YAC is a vital community hub in Southall and their young people deserve the same opportunities with the same qualities as those within and outside of the borough of Ealing. It's closure would be a critical blow not only to Ealing's young people, but also to the wider community.

#SaveTheYAC

Notes:

Ealing Young Champions are a group of young people who live, work or study in Ealing and are passionate about getting Ealing's young voices heard. They are part of the Young Ealing Foundation.

 

  • The YAC has been on the council's asset disposal list for sometime and the current plan is for it to be demolished  and turned into a block of flats

  • The YAC has been underused for sometime despite having a variety of facilities such as a sports hall, outdoor football pitch, music studio, beauty therapy rooms, gym, IT room and juice bar

  • The YAC was gifted to the Council from the Southall community over 30 years ago

  • Over a third of Ealing's population is under the age of 25

  • Young people's mental health is at an all time low

  • During COVID the YAC was used as a vital food hub

  • There are many voluntary sector youth groups in the local area who have expressed an interest in delivering services in the YAC and turning it into the thriving community hub it once was and still has the potential to be

 

 

6

Lily Connolly Woods presented the petition for debate, which was titled 'Prevent the closure of the Young Adults Centre in Southall'.

 

Councillor Nagpal, Cabinet Member for a Fairer Start, responded to the petition.

 

Councillors Millican, Ball and Mason responded to the petition.

 

Councillor Nagpal provided the Council's final response to the petition.

 

7 Petitions from Members of the Public
Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9.
7

There were no petitions from members of the public.

 

8 Petitions from Members of the Council
Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9.
8

Councillor P Anand presented a petition relating to the review of polling places that was being undertaken.

 

9 Questions from Members of the Public
Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9. To consider any questions from members of the public, due notice having been received.
9

There were no questions from members of the public.

 

10 Questions from Members of the Council
To deal with questions of which notice has been given in accordance with Rule 10 of the Council and Committee Procedure Rules.
10

Councillor Sahota asked Councillor Mahfouz:

 

The Conservatives seem to be continuing to pursue cutting the Universal Credit uplift despite the devastating impact it could have on many families. Can the portfolio holder give an update on the expected impact in Ealing?

 

Councillor Mahfouz responded:

 

According to August 21 data, in Ealing there were 35,835 households on Universal Credit with 35% of these households being families with children and 65% of households without children (single and couples).

 

The £20 per week Universal Credit uplift was introduced in March 2020 as a temporary measure to mitigate effects of Covid19 pandemic. It was originally set to last for a year, however, following an extension, it has come to an end on 6th October 2021.

 

The calculation of £20 per week loss multiplied by households means that Universal Credit households with children in Ealing will be losing around £252,380 per week in total and households without children will be losing £464,320 per week.

 

However, the calculated losses will be lower in reality. As Universal Credit is a means tested benefit, households in employment would not have received full £20 per week and this would have been apportioned in a means tested calculation of Universal Credit entitlement taking into account the claimants’ earnings.  Currently, there is no local data available on how many of the above households are in employment, however, national data suggests that around 40% of Universal Credit households are in work, which means that around 21,501 Ealing households would have been entitled to full £20 per week uplift up to 6 October. 

 

As the households without children account for majority of Universal Credit claimants, the impact on this group is potentially bigger than on families with children. 

 

According to the Resolution Foundation, single households will be affected most as the withdrawal of £20 per week uplift will mean a loss of income between 21% to 25% depending on age. Couples will lose between 15% and 18% depending on age. Those in employment will be less affected due to the means testing nature of the UC.

 

Councillor Conti asked Councillor Costigan:

 

The independent review of public engagement in low traffic 
neighbourhoods in Ealing found that the administration's failure in respect of public engagement leading to not only additional costs but reputational damage and that engagement of local people was far from best practice. How will the council ensure that this doesn’t happen again?

 

Councillor Costigan responded:

 

Mr Mayor, I note that this is a question I’ve already answered at the cabinet meeting, but I will indulge Councillor Conti.

 

We pledged to be an open, inclusive and transparent council, and this report is us doing just that.

 

The independent review was commissioned to investigate what went right and what went wrong, and to help us learn to do schemes like this better in future.

 

It recommends that the council develops a new charter setting out key principles for engaging with residents and stakeholders on active travel schemes, ensuring that local people are involved from the very beginning. 


We’re currently working on bringing this forward, and will continue to put local people in the driving seat of change in their communities.

 

Councillor Brett asked Councillor Mason:

 

Can the Leader give us more detail on the Armed Forces Covenant, and what this means for forces families in Ealing?

 

Councillor Mason responded:

 

I was delighted to be able to attend the base of 562 Squadron in Southall with yourself, Mr Mayor, last week to sign the renewed Armed Forces Covenant on behalf of the Council.


The Covenant is the promise that we make, as a council, alongside the public, private and voluntary sectors locally, to those who serve or have served in the armed forces. We are pledging that all those who serve or have served their country will be treated fairly; that their service will be recognised and remembered; and that, crucially, we will do everything we can to ensure they face no disadvantage as a result of their service.


By renewing the Covenant, we are promising to redouble those efforts to recognise and mitigate the special challenges that face serving members of the armed forces, veterans and their families.

 

To give a few examples:


We recognise that the mobile nature of forces life can lead to disadvantage when forces families apply for help with housing. So we exempt forces members and veteran for the usual residency requirements.

 

That same mobility makes it harder for forces families to get a school place - so we have changed our school admissions policy to make it easier for forces families.

 

We are committing the council to being a forces-friendly employer, recognising the huge range of transferable skills held by those who have served, and adjusting our recruitment processes to make them inclusive and accessible for veterans.

 

We are providing flexibility in leave policies for service spouses and partners before, during and after a partner’s deployment.

 

With the aim of tackling high unemployment rates among veterans, we are ensuring that the training and skills programmes that we and our partners deliver in the borough are rel-evant and tailored to veterans.

 

And we will be providing new sources of information, including a dedicated webpage, so that serving members of the armed forces and veterans can identify sources of help, and know what to expect from their council.


We owe a debt of gratitude to all those who serve, and to their families. Renewing the covenant is our first step to repaying that debt.

 

Councillor Dabrowska asked Councillor Mason:

 

Which Councillors have not attended a meeting that counts towards a Councillor's attendance record under Section 85 (2) of the Local Government Act 1972 since the virtual meetings regulations expired in May?

 

Councillor Mason responded:

 

To ensure the compliance with the pandemic lockdown, the government temporarily allowed local authorities to meet virtually until 17 May 2021. Despite lockdown not yet being ended, and with the Local Government Association which is led by the Conservative Party encouraging the government to relent, and with considerable concerns over novel coronavirus strains, potential spikes in infection, alongside a low and sluggish vaccination rate, the government refused to extend virtual meeting regulations or to legislate to allow for hybrid meetings.

 

So since 17 May all Councillors bar Councillors D Crawford, Lusuardi, Dhami, Dheer, Byrne, Camadoo-Rothwell, Murtagh, Aslam, Mann, Chohan and Dhindsa have attended in person Council meetings.

 

All Councillors have participated in hybrid meetings, helped residents through casework and fully participated as members of the Council.

 

Councillor Dabrowska will note from the Councillors that I have just listed that they are either clinically vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, care for those that are extremely vulnerable or have volunteered to make way for other Councillors to attend in person meetings so that all participants can follow the social distancing guidelines in place in our buildings. This therefore allowed Conservatives and Liberal Democrats to send their full delegations to Council and other meetings.

 

Councillor Dhadwal asked Councillor Costigan:

 

Can the portfolio holder give us an update on COP26, and work the council is doing to tackle the climate crisis?

 

Councillor Costigan responded:

 

Our communications and activities will run from this week through 14 November.

 

To give local relevance to these often complex and challenging global negotiations, we will use the COP26 conference to inform our residents and businesses of our local work on the climate and ecological crisis through a series of news stories. We plan to highlight energy efficiency, active travel and biodiversity in this series.

 

We have also done a “call out” to the public to nominate Local Climate Leaders. These are everyday people who are doing their part to tackle climate change, often in unexpected ways. They’re not activists or officials, just ordinary people who are going One Step Greener for the planet. We will highlight these through daily social media posts, in the hope of inspiring others to take action.

 

To facilitate personal action, we will sign post people in Ealing environmental activities and volunteer opportunities. Ealing’s new climate action hub ActForEaling has published a COP26 calendar on their website. It lists local events and activities offered through community groups and the council. ActforEaling has also created a resource page for schools, including toolkits on COP26 and other curriculum ideas.

 

As a show of collective support from the public sector and faith communities, we will light the town hall green over the COP26 fortnight (with no increase to carbon emissions).

 

In terms of progress on our Climate and Ecological Emergency Strategy:

 

 We have made excellent headway on energy efficiency over the past 12-months, securing over £6.7m to improve homes and council buildings to help meet our Net Zero ambition. A further £10m is pending award to deliver more retrofitting in 2022.

 

Our work on food will be finalised in December, and it directs us to create a partnership with community groups and businesses to build a more sustainable food system. We will undertake this work in 2022.

 

The borough continues to lead on nature conservation projects, and soon the Biodiversity Action Plan will be finalised giving us a clear work plan to ensure our green spaces continue to be extraordinary places for both nature and our residents.

 

Active travel remains a key priority for reducing carbon emissions, and we are working on articulating our commitments and resourcing further work to make active travel the preferred option for short journeys in the borough.

 

Our waste minimisation team has been working diligently on rolling out more food waste collections to our residents living in flats. Since food waste is major source of carbon emissions, this is an essential step for the borough.

 

 

11 Opposition Motion for Debate

This Council notes that under the threat of COVID-19, several Council services were closed, suspended or halted.

 

As everyday life is now returning to normal for most people and with one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, this Council welcomes the Prime Minister’s call for a return to the office.

 

Nevertheless, the Council has yet to resume a number of resident facing services including:

 

  • Gurnell Leisure Centre 

  • Pitshanger Library 

  • Ward Forum Meetings 

  • Opening the Refuse and Recycle Centres to drive in again without having to have made an appointment

 

This Council, therefore, supports the restarting of Council services beginning with a plan to reopen Gurnell Leisure Centre.

11

The opposition motion for debate was moved by Councillor Stafford and seconded by Councillor Conti.

 

Councillors Costigan, Malcolm, Raza, Young, Ball, Gallant, Rice and Donnelly responded to the motion.

 

A vote was taken and the motion FELL.

 

 

12 Other Motions for Debate

The Health and Social Care Levy

 

This council notes:

 

  • The Conservatives tax hike is a manifesto-breaking, economically damaging, unfair tax on jobs.

  • The Tory Health and Social Care Levy is the biggest rise in taxes on families for over 50 years, with no thought to the impact on working people.

  • Boris Johnson's tax rise means a landlord who owns and rents out dozens of properties won’t pay a penny more, but their tenants working in full-time jobs will.

  • A retired billionaire will contribute nothing under this new Tory plan, while nurses, teachers, social workers and social care workers will lose out. 

  • The government can't even say when and if they can clear the NHS backlog - which means we won't know when this money will even be spent on social care.

  • This is the third tax rise on working families from the Conservatives in recent months, a hat trick of broken manifesto promises hitting hard working families. 

  • This is a government that underfunded and weakened the NHS and social care for a decade before the pandemic. NHS waiting lists spiralled, up by two million, and crucial targets on cancer, A&E and mental health were already being missed. 

  • Yet again, the government has failed to involve local government in their decision making, despite the fact that councils like Ealing are on the frontline of the social care crisis.

  • The Conservatives proposals will also do nothing to fix the social care crisis, missing the long-term plan of reform and investment our NHS and social care system needs. 

  • Simply restoring the access to care services caused by austerity-era cuts to local authorities’ government grants would cost £12.5bn.

  • Of the £36bn raised by hiking tax on working people over the next three years, only £5.4bn is for social care, and the majority of the allocation will be used to fund the cap on care costs, not to improve care.

This council rejects the Conservatives’ health and social care levy and commits to:

 

  • Writing to the Conservative secretary of state and Boris Johnson to demand they rethink this ill thought out and unfair tax hike on working people. 

  • Continuing to campaign for a fair and sustainable funding settlement for social care, which this plan is not.
12

Councillor Johnson proposed and Councillor Mason seconded the other motion for debate.

 

Councillors Tighe and Millican responded to the motion.

 

RESOLVED:

 

This council notes:

 

  • The Conservatives tax hike is a manifesto-breaking, economically damaging, unfair tax on jobs.

  • The Tory Health and Social Care Levy is the biggest rise in taxes on families for over 50 years, with no thought to the impact on working people.

  • Boris Johnson's tax rise means a landlord who owns and rents out dozens of properties won’t pay a penny more, but their tenants working in full-time jobs will.

  • A retired billionaire will contribute nothing under this new Tory plan, while nurses, teachers, social workers and social care workers will lose out.

  • The government can't even say when and if they can clear the NHS backlog - which means we won't know when this money will even be spent on social care.

  • This is the third tax rise on working families from the Conservatives in recent months, a hat trick of broken manifesto promises hitting hard working families.

  • This is a government that underfunded and weakened the NHS and social care for a decade before the pandemic. NHS waiting lists spiralled, up by two million, and crucial targets on cancer, A&E and mental health were already being missed.

  • Yet again, the government has failed to involve local government in their decision making, despite the fact that councils like Ealing are on the frontline of the social care crisis.

  • The Conservatives proposals will also do nothing to fix the social care crisis, missing the long-term plan of reform and investment our NHS and social care system needs.

  • Simply restoring the access to care services caused by austerity-era cuts to local authorities’ government grants would cost £12.5bn.

  • Of the £36bn raised by hiking tax on working people over the next three years, only £5.4bn is for social care, and the majority of the allocation will be used to fund the cap on care costs, not to improve care.

 

This council rejects the Conservatives’ health and social care levy and commits to:

 

  • Writing to the Conservative secretary of state and Boris Johnson to demand they rethink this ill thought out and unfair tax hike on working people.

  • Continuing to campaign for a fair and sustainable funding settlement for social care, which this plan is not.

 

13 Motions not for Debate

Afghanistan 
 
This council notes

  • The government has overseen a series of chaotic failures and miscalculations in Afghanistan that have damaged our international reputation, weakened our security and tragically meant Brits and Afghans who worked alongside us have been left behind. 

  • Despite having 18 months to prepare for withdrawal, their failure to plan, their inability to influence others and the complacency they have shown towards the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan has resulted in the chaos we have seen over the past weeks.

  • While we are incredibly grateful for the brave efforts of troops and civil servants on the ground, the catastrophic collapse in Afghanistan has left huge numbers of people stranded in fear for their lives.

 
This council believes:

 

  • Britain has an obligation to help people who have been left in Afghanistan. This includes people who have served alongside Britain’s representatives in Afghanistan and those Afghans who stepped up in to public life - especially women - with assurances about national security.

  • Britain should play a leading role in focusing international efforts to address the humanitarian and refugee crisis.

  • Ealing stands ready to help, but the Government must come forward and outline how they will help fund the scheme and what the overarching strategy is.

Our thoughts are with the people of Afghanistan, and particularly for the women whose freedoms are being taken away from them, and the future generations of children who face growing up under oppressive Taliban rule. 
 
This Council commits to welcome Afghan refugees seeking safety into our communities.
 
Ealing’s Plan for Good Jobs
 
This council welcomes the publication of Ealing’s Plan for Good jobs and notes:

 

  • Ealing’s economy and local jobs have been strongly impacted by the pandemic.

  • Ealing has had the 2nd highest number of furloughed employments in London (Mar 21) and the 4th highest number of out of work benefits claimants in London (Feb 21).

  • Ealing Council’s commitment to help Ealing get back on its feet and create a sustainable economy post Covid. 

  • Ealing’s Plan for Good Jobs shows how economic growth can be achieved in a more sustainable way by putting climate action, inclusion and social justice at its core.

  • Ealing Council has three priorities: creating good jobs, tackling the climate crisis and fighting inequality. 

This council resolves to create good jobs here in Ealing, and to:

 

  • Make Ealing the best place in West London to live, learn, work, invest and visit

  • Make it easier for local people to know how and where to find job and training opportunities

  • Help local people retrain and upskill for jobs in growing industries

  • Welcome new businesses and offer support to get local businesses off the ground

  • Support businesses through our Apprenticeship and Traineeship programmes

  • Consult on policy to create more affordable spaces for businesses in Ealing

COP26 and the climate crisis
 
This council notes:

 

  • Every week is bringing more evidence of the devastation of the climate crisis - wildfires ravaging the Mediterranean and floods drowning the American coastlines.

  • The UK is bracing for a winter where we will see more extreme weather events and resulting strains on public services.

  • The Committee on Climate Change states that the UK is way off track to meet its greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

  • This council’s commitment to tackling the climate crisis.

  • The upcoming COP26 summit in Glasgow.

This council believes: 

 

  • That the Conservative government are failing in their ambition to tackle climate change.

  • It is disgraceful that the only meaningful proposals on tackling the climate crisis are coming from climate activists and the Labour Party; it is time for the government to step up and take action on the biggest issue facing us as a species.  

  • There is huge potential for more community-scale renewable energy generation infrastructure to be built across the country and for this growth to bring substantial benefits to local economies – this isn’t being encouraged or supported by the Conservatives.

  • We cannot trust Boris Johnson to fight the climate crisis and secure the future of our planet without considerable political and public pressure.  

This council calls for:

 

  • The Conservative government to finally wake up to the reality of the climate crisis and take a lead.

  • The government must work with other world leaders at COP26 to commit to a global carbon budget to limit warming to 1.5°C

  • The government must join this council and support the Local Energy Bill – enabling community-scale renewable energy generation to make more sustainable energy and support local economies and green jobs post Covid-19.

  • The government must join this council and support the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill - establishing a framework of overarching policy imperatives that recognise our responsibility to reduce the UK’s entire emissions and ecological footprint as fairly and urgently as possible

 

Conservative Motion not for Debate

 

The new housing Minister recently announced that fresh new laws would ban ‘ugly development’ and acknowledged that homes built out of steel and concrete had the worst environmental impact. 

  

This Council welcomes residents having the right to vote against development that will be a blot on their landscape and the acknowledgement of the dangers of embedded carbon in buildings, especially tall buildings.

 
13

Afghanistan

 

This council notes:

 

  • The government has overseen a series of chaotic failures and miscalculations in Afghanistan that have damaged our international reputation, weakened our security and tragically meant Brits and Afghans who worked alongside us have been left behind.

  • Despite having 18 months to prepare for withdrawal, their failure to plan, their inability to influence others and the complacency they have shown towards the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan has resulted in the chaos we have seen over the past weeks.

  • While we are incredibly grateful for the brave efforts of troops and civil servants on the ground, the catastrophic collapse in Afghanistan has left huge numbers of people stranded in fear for their lives.

 

This council believes:

 

  • Britain has an obligation to help people who have been left in Afghanistan. This includes people who have served alongside Britain’s representatives in Afghanistan and those Afghans who stepped up in to public life - especially women - with assurances about national security.

  • Britain should play a leading role in focusing international efforts to address the humanitarian and refugee crisis.

  • Ealing stands ready to help, but the Government must come forward and outline how they will help fund the scheme and what the overarching strategy is.

 

Our thoughts are with the people of Afghanistan, and particularly for the women whose freedoms are being taken away from them, and the future generations of children who face growing up under oppressive Taliban rule.

 

This Council commits to welcome Afghan refugees seeking safety into our communities.

 

Ealing’s Plan for Good Jobs

 

This council welcomes the publication of Ealing’s Plan for Good jobs and notes:

 

  • Ealing’s economy and local jobs have been strongly impacted by the pandemic.

  • Ealing has had the 2nd highest number of furloughed employments in London (Mar 21) and the 4th highest number of out of work benefits claimants in London (Feb 21).

  • Ealing Council’s commitment to help Ealing get back on its feet and create a sustainable economy post Covid.

  • Ealing’s Plan for Good Jobs shows how economic growth can be achieved in a more sustainable way by putting climate action, inclusion and social justice at its core.

  • Ealing Council has three priorities: creating good jobs, tackling the climate crisis and fighting inequality.

 

This council resolves to create good jobs here in Ealing, and to:

 

  • Make Ealing the best place in West London to live, learn, work, invest and visit.

  • Make it easier for local people to know how and where to find job and training opportunities.

  • Help local people retrain and upskill for jobs in growing industries.

  • Welcome new businesses and offer support to get local businesses off the ground.
  • Support businesses through our Apprenticeship and Traineeship programmes.

  • Consult on policy to create more affordable spaces for businesses in Ealing.

 

COP26 and the climate crisis

 

This council notes:

 

  • Every week is bringing more evidence of the devastation of the climate crisis - wildfires ravaging the Mediterranean and floods drowning the American coastlines.

  • The UK is bracing for a winter where we will see more extreme weather events and resulting strains on public services.

  • The Committee on Climate Change states that the UK is way off track to meet its greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

  • This council’s commitment to tackling the climate crisis.

  • The upcoming COP26 summit in Glasgow.

 

This council believes:

 

  • That the Conservative government are failing in their ambition to tackle climate change.

  • It is disgraceful that the only meaningful proposals on tackling the climate crisis are coming from climate activists and the Labour Party; it is time for the government to step up and take action on the biggest issue facing us as a species.

  • There is huge potential for more community-scale renewable energy generation infrastructure to be built across the country and for this growth to bring substantial benefits to local economies – this isn’t being encouraged or supported by the Conservatives.

  • We cannot trust Boris Johnson to fight the climate crisis and secure the future of our planet without considerable political and public pressure.

 

This council calls for:

 

  • The Conservative government to finally wake up to the reality of the climate crisis and take a lead.

  • The government must work with other world leaders at COP26 to commit to a global carbon budget to limit warming to 1.5°C

  • The government must join this council and support the Local Energy Bill – enabling community-scale renewable energy generation to make more sustainable energy and support local economies and green jobs post Covid-19.

  • The government must join this council and support the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill - establishing a framework of overarching policy imperatives that recognise our responsibility to reduce the UK’s entire emissions and ecological footprint as fairly and urgently as possible.

 

Conservative motion not for debate

 

The new housing Minister recently announced that fresh new laws would ban ‘ugly development’ and acknowledged that homes built out of steel and concrete had the worst environmental impact.


  
This Council welcomes residents the right to vote against development that will be a blot on their landscape and the acknowledgement of the dangers of embedded carbon in buildings, especially tall buildings.


However, this Council notes with grave concern the proposals to severely reduce the ability of local authorities to prevent unacceptable developments in the planning proposals previously published by the government.

 

Council requests that cabinet come forward with a new Local Development Plan without further delay and requires that the plan sets robust requirements regarding excessive housing density, tall buildings and increases carbon offset requirements.


 
14

An additional motion was moved on this report, adding the following to the resolutions:

 

In the interest of openness and transparency, the Council will publish the names of all Cllrs who would have been disqualified if not for this dispensation.

 

A  recorded vote was taken and the motion fell.

 

Voting:

 

For - Councillors Conti, Dabrowska, Gallant, Kumar, Malcolm, Millican, Stafford, Steed and Young.

 

Against - Councillors J Anand, Ball, Block, Brett, Costigan, Donnelly, Gordon, Gulaid, Jammu, Johnson, Kelly, Mahfouz, Manro, Mason, Midha, Mohan, Nagpal, Padda, Raza, Rice, Rooney, Sabiers, Sharma, Shaw and Tighe.

 

Abstentions - Councillor M Ahmed.

 

A further recorded vote was taken on the resolutions within the report and it was

 

RESOLVED:

That by reason of restrictions necessitated as a result of the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, a dispensation to the six month attendance rule, pursuant to Section 85 of the Local Government Act 1972, be granted to all Councillors for the period up until 10th May 2022.

 

Voting:

 

For - Councillors J Anand, Ball, Block, Brett, Costigan, Donnelly, Gordon, Gulaid, Jammu, Johnson, Kelly, Mahfouz, Manro, Mason, Midha, Mohan, Nagpal, Padda, Raza, Rice, Rooney, Sabiers, Sharma, Shaw and Tighe.

 

Against - Councillors Conti, Dabrowska, Gallant, Kumar, Malcolm, Millican, Stafford, Steed and Young.

 

Abstentions - Councillor M Ahmed.

 

15

RESOLVED: That the changes to the Council's constitution, as set out in the appendices, are agreed.

 

 

16

RESOLVED: That

 

1. The Treasury Management activities and performance against targets for the period to 31 March 2021 are noted.

 

2. The Council’s investment balance of £228.598m as at 31 March 2021 of which £196,500m was invested with the Debt Management Office (DMO) is noted.

 

3. The Prudential Indicators outturn for 2020/21 are noted. These have all be maintained within the limits set by full Council in February 2020 (set out in Appendix 2).

 

 

17 Urgent key decisions exempted from call-in

There were no urgent key decisions exempted from call-in since the last Council meeting.

 

17

There were no urgent key decisions exempted from call-in.

 

18 Appointments to Committees and Other Bodies

The following changes to appointments to Committees have been proposed by party whips:

 

  1. Councillor Donnelly to replace Councillor Martin on the Council and Trade Union Joint Committee.

  2. Councillor Woodroofe to replace Councillor Aslam on Planning Committee.

 

The following appointment to an Outside body to the Council has been proposed by the party whips:

 

Councillor Johnson to be appointed to the one vacancy the Council has on the Gunnersbury Park Museum and Regeneration Trust.

 

Note: The Gunnersbury Park Museum and Regeneration Trust was incorrectly named Gunnersbury Park Regeneration Trust and allocated 3 vacancies at the annual meeting on 18 May 2021. This appointment supersedes these appointments as the trust is now correctly named and the correct number of vacancies are referred to.

 

18

RESOLVED: That

 

1. Councillor Donnelly replaces Councillor Martin on the Council and Trade Union Joint Committee.

 

2. Councillor Woodroofe replaces Councillor Aslam on the Planning Committee.

 

3. Councillor Johnson is appointed as the Council's representative on the Gunnersbury Park Museum and Regeneration Trust.

 

 

19 Date of Next Meeting

The next meeting will be held on 14 December 2021.

 


19

The next meeting was scheduled to be held on 14 December 2021.

 

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Member NameItem Ref.DetailsNature of DeclarationAction
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