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Meetings

Meeting Details

Council
14 Dec 2021 - 19:00 to 22:00
  • Documents
  • Attendance
  • Declarations of Interests
  • Visitors

Documents

Agenda

Blank
Standard Items
1 Apologies for Absence
1

Apologies for absence were received from the Mayor and Councillor Chohan.

Councillors M Ahmed, S Ahmed, P Anand, Anjum, Bell, Block, Brett, Burke, Busuttil, Byrne, Conlan, D Crawford, K Crawford, Dabrowska, Dhadwal, Dheer, Kaur Dheer, Dhindsa, Driscoll, Gordon, Jammu, Lusuardi, Mahfouz, Mahmood, G Mann, R Mann, Martin, Mohan, Murtagh, Padda, Rai, Rooney, Camadoo-Rothwell, Sabiers, Sharma, Steed, Summers, Sumner, Tighe, R Wall and Woodroofe were present virtually.

The Mayor could not attend in person so the Deputy Mayor chaired the meeting.

 

2 Declarations of Interest
2

Councillor Mason declared that he was a shareholder nominated non-executive on the London Collective Investment Vehicle. Councillor Mason viewed this as a declarable pecuniary interest and therefore would not be voting on any items relating to the Pension fund but would remain in the meeting throughout.

 

3 Matters to be Considered in Private
3

RESOLVED: That all matters be considered in public, as proposed.

 

To agree as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 19 October 2021.

 

4

RESOLVED: That the minutes of the meeting held on 19 October 2021 are agreed as a correct record of the meeting.

 

5 Mayor's Announcements
5

The Deputy Mayor updated the Council on civic matters. The Deputy Mayor:

  • Explained that the Mayor wasn't able to attend the meeting in person, and this was why the Deputy Mayor had chaired the meeting.

  • Passed on condolences to Councillor Dabrowska who had lost her father.
  • Highlighted that Hannukah and Diwali had taken place in the previous few weeks.

  • Thanked Paul Najsarek for his six years of dedicated service to the Council and wished him a prosperous and happy future.

  • Wished all Councillors a happy Christmas and New Year.

 

 

6 Petitions from Members of the Public

Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9.

Notice has been given that a petition with 120 signatures on the following subject has been submitted:

We the undersigned demand:

1. Ealing Borough Council must completely divest from fossil fuels by 2025,

2. Recognise climate refugees and do not report rough sleepers to the Home Office, and

3. Commit to phasing out single use plastic.

 

6

A petition was submitted with 120 signatures on the following subject:

We the undersigned demand:

1. Ealing Borough Council must completely divest from fossil fuels by 2025,

2. Recognise climate refugees and do not report rough sleepers to the Home Office, and

3. Commit to phasing out single use plastic.

Councillor Donnelly, Cabinet Member for Inclusive Economy, responded to the petition in his capacity as Chair of the Pension Fund Panel.

 

7 Petitions from Members of the Council

Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9.


7

There were no petitions from members of the Council.

 

8 Questions from Members of the Public

Submitted under Council and Committee Procedure Rule 9. To consider any questions from members of the public, due notice having been received.


8

There were no questions from members of the public.

 

9 Questions from Members of the Council

To deal with questions of which notice has been given in accordance with Rule 10 of the Council and Committee Procedure Rules.


9

Councillor Steed asked Councillor Costigan:

Please note the poor performance of the Council's Tree Service over the past year. Can the Portfolio Holder confirm that the current contractor for tree pruning has or will be replaced and that any new contract will be managed more effectively?

Councillor Costigan responded:

Cabinet had already agreed to re-tender the arboricultural contract on 13 October 2021. The new contract would be awarded on 1 April 2022. The reason it was re-tendered was as the current contractor was not delivering the service that was expected. In fairness to the contractor Tree Surgeons were in short supply across the country and particularly in London. The contractor did not have the staff to deliver the contract and this was the reasons for the poor performance. However reactive works and emergency provision were undertaken but the contractor did not have the staff to provide a complete service. Three wards were initially taken out of the contract - Ealing Common, Hobbayne and Southfields - and these areas had contracts awarded to three other companies to see if they were able to deliver where the original contractor couldn't. The new contracts for Hobbayne and Ealing Common were live and had seen a much improved service including positive feedback from residents. However the contractor for Southfields still did not deliver the service required due to some issues around parked cars preventing access to trees.

Councillor Mohan asked Councillor Nagpal:

Can the portfolio holder comment on the recent Children and Young People Now awards and Ealing’s winning Building my Future programme?

Councillor Nagpal responded:

The Children and Young People Now Awards 2021 aim to recognise and celebrate inspiring initiatives across the UK by professionals who work to improve the life chances of children, young people and their families. The awards are split into categories that reflect the breadth and diversity of the sector. I am incredibly proud of Ealing winning an award for the Building My Future (BMF) programme was selected as a winner of the Early Intervention award and shortlisted for the Public Sector Children's team award. The awards panel recognised that the BMF team, which was a multi agency and multi professional team, was innovative, dynamic, responsive and worked very efficiently to meet the needs with children and young people with complex additional needs. The BMF programme was supported from 2018 to 2021 through the Department for Educations Children's Social Care Innovation Programme and the BMF programme was co-produced with parents, carers and young people in its design, development and delivery. It addressed a growing need to support young people aged 5-25 with additional needs who were at risk of school or social exclusion. A total of 253 children and their families were successfully supported through the three year period. The BMF model also showed indications of longer term cost savings due to better outcomes for those it supported.

Councillor Kumar asked Councillor Donnelly:

What is the average telephone waiting time for calls to the Council to be answered, and does the performance for this service give residents a first-class service?

Councillor Donnelly responded:

Contact centre waiting times have been steadily improving since April 2021. In April the average wait time was 9 minutes 20 seconds,  in September it was 6 minutes 20 seconds, in October it was 5 minutes 30 seconds and in November 5 minutes 47 seconds. In addition, to improve customer satisfaction customer services offer a call-back service at peak times. Since 1 April this year 41,386 requests for a call-back were received and 97% of those customers had their request fulfilled.

Councillor Rooney asked Councillor Raza:

Can the portfolio holder tell us more about the borough wide consultation on women's safety?

Councillor Raza responded:

Ealing has been at the forefront of protecting and promoting women's safety with a groundbreaking Public Spaces Protection Order on Mattock Lane being an example. However we can do more to protect women, and following the tragic murder of several women in London who were murdered in public places women's safety has rightly become a national issue. We want to get this right so are asking for women across the borough to provide their views and experiences to help the Safer Ealing Partnership understand women's perception of their safety in the Borough. To do this the partnership has launched a listening exercise called 'A Safer Ealing for Women' to hear the views of women and girls who live, work and travel in Ealing. There are three main themes to this - what role should the safer Ealing partnership play in creating safe spaces for women, where are the spaces where women and girls currently feel unsafe and what experience of harassment and abuse had women and girls had in Ealing. The responses to this information will help to inform the partnership's targets and resources and shape Ealing's Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy which is due to be published next year. The consultation will run until 4 February 2022 and will be accompanied by a mapping exercise to help the Council understand the locations where women and girls feel unsafe.

Councillor Millican asked Councillor Nagpal:

 What is the difference in per pupil funding between the highest and lowest funded primary schools in the borough?

Councillor Nagpal responded:

The Ealing Schools Funding Formula is aligned with the national funding formula and has been so in recent years. This formula helps set the budget for mainstream schools serving reception to year 11. The funding for 2022-23 is identical to the national funding formula. However there may be minor adjustments for affordability purposes. Decisions on local formulae are made alongside local schools in the Ealing Schools Forum. Therefore schools are involved with and directly influence the direction of travel on local funding arrangements. The national and local funding formula guarantee minimum funding levels per pupil, but also prioritise funding for areas of greater deprivation and attainment levels. The schools with the lowest per pupil funding see around 7% of their pupils being eligible for deprivation based funding whereas the school with the highest per pupil funding sees around 40% of its pupils eligible for this funding. Per pupil funding for primary schools in 2021-22 ranges from £4,017 per pupil to £5,250 and the average is £4,655 per pupil. Many of Most of Ealing's highest achieving schools are those with the lower level of pupil funding and 93% of schools in Ealing were rated good or outstanding by Ofsted.

Councillor Dhadwal asked Councillor Blacker:

Can the portfolio holder give us an update on the Omicron variant?

Councillor Blacker responded:

Emerging research showed the variant transmitted much quicker than previous variants. Existing COVID vaccines were less effective to some degree, although boosters did increase effectiveness. There was also increased risk of reinfection for those that had previously tested positive for COVID. London had shown a significant spike in cases over the last seven days and had overtaken the national rate by a significant margin. In London there had been a 30% increase in the last seven days from 440 to 570 cases per 100,000 of population which took us higher than the England average. Ealing's growth was slower than London, at 20%, but this took us higher than the England average. It was estimated that around 44% of new London cases were of the Omicrom variant and this was expected to be 50% when the next statistics were released today. The time it takes for Omicrom cases to double was estimated to be 2-3 days and possibly less in some regions which was extremely concerning. Current vaccines were expected to provide good protection against severe disease and death, however research showed that vaccinated individuals were more likely to have symptoms albeit mild ones and the booster dose was shown to be effective.

Councillor Ball asked Councillor Costigan:

Does the portfolio holder think it is appropriate that on November 17th Kingdom Security fined a young girl £150 for feeding the ducks in Walpole Park?

Councillor Costigan responded:

Kingdom Security, the Council's contractors for litter enforcement in the Borough, don't issue Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) to anyone under the age of 18. But I don't think it would be appropriate for Kingdom to fine anyone for genuinely feeding the ducks in the park. In terms of this particular incident the Parks team reported that residents had complained about rats in Walpole Park and as a result of that Kindgom Security visited the park and issued two FPNs. One was issued to an individual who was spitting and one to an individual who tipped a bag of bread onto the grass on Walpole Park and then walked away. This behaviour does attract vermin so we do discourage it. Throwing food into the water is an offence under Section 87 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. However we have spoken to our contractor to ensure that they don't issue FPNs for this if they are clearly feeding the ducks rather than littering. The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust issues guidance on feeding water birds as too much reliance on bread can cause physical harm to wildlife so I would urge duck lovers in the Borough to seek this guidance. The Council also had a request from the Canal and River Trust to assist with the issue of people dumping food in the canal, and this had become a real issue as it was very harmful to wildlife and attracts vermin.

 

Motions with Notice

To deal with motions where notice has been given in accordance with Rule 11 of the Council and Committee Procedure Rules.

 


10 Opposition Motion for Debate

No to over-development of Ealing: Growth should enhance its character

Proposed by Councillor Young and seconded by Councillor Stafford.

This Council notes:

  • "Making sure the growth that takes place in Ealing enhances its character, conserves its future and makes great places people want to live," is a commitment in the 2021/22 Council Plan.

  • The recent Planning Inspector’s report on the Manor Road tower inquiry highlighted Ealing's vulnerability to uncontrolled over-development.  The Council’s failure to present the Authority Monitoring Report on their housing figures for over five years worked in developers' favour against residents.

This Council, therefore, calls on the Labour Administration to:

  1. Correct their governance failures so that there is "community confidence," in development process; and

  2. Outline what they will do to ensure that the whole borough is not surrendered to over-development.

 

12

Councillor Gallant moved, and Councillor Kumar seconded, the following motion:

This Council notes:

  • "Making sure the growth that takes place in Ealing enhances its character, conserves its future and makes great places people want to live," is a commitment in the 2021/22 Council Plan.

  • The recent Planning Inspector’s report on the Manor Road tower inquiry highlighted Ealing's vulnerability to uncontrolled over-development.  The Council’s failure to present the Authority Monitoring Report on their housing figures for over five years worked in developers' favour against residents.

This Council, therefore, calls on the Labour Administration to:

  • Correct their governance failures so that there is "community confidence," in development process; and

  • Outline what they will do to ensure that the whole borough is not surrendered to over-development.

Councillor Ball moved, and Councillor Malcolm seconded an amendment to the motion.

Councillors Mason, Stafford, Rice, Dabrowska, Manro, Young and Johnson responded to the motion.

At the conclusion of the debate, a vote was taken on the amendment and the amendment FELL.

A vote was taken on the original motion and the motion FELL.

 

11 Other Motions for Debate

Fighting Inequality in Ealing

Proposed by Councillor Raza and seconded by Councillor Mason.

This council notes the structural inequalities that still exist in Ealing, and the impact this has on every part of people’s lives.

  • Health inequalities mean that life expectancy is lower in Norwood Green than Northfield. Men living in more deprived areas of our borough have a lower average life expectancy by almost 6 years, and women of almost 4. 

  • Over half of Ealing’s population is from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds, and our residents speak over 170 languages. But these communities experience higher levels of deprivation, lower levels of employment and lower paid jobs. 

  • The impact of climate breakdown is being and will continue to be felt by the poorest in society. The availability of food will cause price rises and the climate crisis will cause unpredictable weather and flash flooding.

  • There are 11,000 families currently on the housing waiting list and Ealing has the third highest rate of accepted homelessness duties in London. Those stuck in the private rented sector face rising rents and shoddy accommodation, with house prices remaining out of reach for so many of us, and Ealing has a higher rate of evictions than the London average. 

  • In Pitshanger, households’ average earnings are around £73,000 per year. In parts of Southall or Northolt, just a few miles away, the average is £31k lower.

  • The Ealing Foodbank has now served 100,000 food parcels to local people who cannot afford food since 2013. 

  • Ealing’s local economy is very dependent on Heathrow and its supply chains and has been hit hard by Covid-19 restrictions on air travel. We still have an unemployment rate higher than the rest of London, and we need to create more new good jobs with decent living incomes right here in Ealing.

  • A third of Ealing’s workforce are earning less than the London Living Wage and 30,000 of households across Ealing are currently claiming Universal Credit.

This council recognises that people are not born with equal opportunities in our borough, whether that is because of their gender, sexuality, race, religion, disability or the income of their parents. 

This council resolves to fight inequality wherever we find it, and to strive to ensure that everyone in Ealing has access to opportunities and services regardless of their background and income. 

This council welcomes the forthcoming publication of the Ealing Race Equality Commission report and recommits to implementing its recommendations in full.

The council further commits to:

  • Working to tackle inequality in the job market and in incomes, by creating good jobs right here in Ealing.  

  • Taking responsibility for improving engagement with Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities.

  • Working with partners to tackle youth homelessness, including of LGBT+ young people.

  • Working with partners to improve mental health care and social care provision for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic residents. 

  • Lobbying for Covid-19 vaccination hubs in areas of deprivation.

  • Working to ensure that the council workforce is reflective of the diverse communities we serve at every level, and setting up a mechanism for a transparent Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic pay gap analysis. 

 

 

 

 
13

Councillor Raza moved, and Councillor Mason seconded, the motion.

Councillors Conti, Busuttil, Jammu, Millican, Anjum, Kumar, Tailor, Stafford, Mason, J Anand and Manro responded to the motion.

At the end of the debate it was

RESOLVED: That

This council notes the structural inequalities that still exist in Ealing, and the impact this has on every part of people’s lives.

Health inequalities mean that life expectancy is lower in Norwood Green than Northfield. Men living in more deprived areas of our borough have a lower average life expectancy by almost 6 years, and women of almost 4. 

Over half of Ealing’s population is from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds, and our residents speak over 170 languages. But these communities experience higher levels of deprivation, lower levels of employment and lower paid jobs. 

The impact of climate breakdown is being and will continue to be felt by the poorest in society. The availability of food will cause price rises and the climate crisis will cause unpredictable weather and flash flooding.

There are 11,000 families currently on the housing waiting list and Ealing has the third highest rate of accepted homelessness duties in London. Those stuck in the private rented sector face rising rents and shoddy accommodation, with house prices remaining out of reach for so many of us, and Ealing has a higher rate of evictions than the London average. 

In Pitshanger, households’ average earnings are around £73,000 per year. In parts of Southall or Northolt, just a few miles away, the average is £31k lower.

The Ealing Foodbank has now served 100,000 food parcels to local people who cannot afford food since 2013. 

Ealing’s local economy is very dependent on Heathrow and its supply chains and has been hit hard by Covid-19 restrictions on air travel. We still have an unemployment rate higher than the rest of London, and we need to create more new good jobs with decent living incomes right here in Ealing.

A third of Ealing’s workforce are earning less than the London Living Wage and 30,000 of households across Ealing are currently claiming Universal Credit.

This council recognises that people are not born with equal opportunities in our borough, whether that is because of their gender, sexuality, race, religion, disability or the income of their parents. 

This council resolves to fight inequality wherever we find it, and to strive to ensure that everyone in Ealing has access to opportunities and services regardless of their background and income. 

This council welcomes the forthcoming publication of the Ealing Race Equality Commission report and recommits to implementing its recommendations in full.

The council further commits to:

Working to tackle inequality in the job market and in incomes, by creating good jobs right here in Ealing.  

Taking responsibility for improving engagement with Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities.

Working with partners to tackle youth homelessness, including of LGBT+ young people.

Working with partners to improve mental health care and social care provision for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic residents. 

Lobbying for Covid-19 vaccination hubs in areas of deprivation.

Working to ensure that the council workforce is reflective of the diverse communities we serve at every level, and setting up a mechanism for a transparent Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic pay gap analysis. 

12 Motions not for Debate

Ealing Foodbank

Proposed by Councillor Lusuardi and seconded by Councillor Martin.

As the Ealing Foodbank reaches the milestone of 100,000 food parcels distributed to local people, this Council expresses admiration and thanks to the volunteers and community groups who have supported so many of our communities through the Ealing Foodbank. We urge Ealing residents to continue to generously donate the items they can spare to the foodbank.

This Council also expresses sorrow and anger that a foodbank needs to exist in 2021 in Ealing, and that families in our borough are still struggling to afford food. This is the reality of over a decade of austerity and cuts to public services under Conservative prime ministers.

We pledge to continue to do everything we can to support anyone struggling in Ealing, and to eradicate food poverty.

 

14

RESOLVED: That

As the Ealing Foodbank reaches the milestone of 100,000 food parcels distributed to local people, this Council expresses admiration and thanks to the volunteers and community groups who have supported so many of our communities through the Ealing Foodbank. We urge Ealing residents to continue to generously donate the items they can spare to the foodbank.

This Council also expresses sorrow and anger that a foodbank needs to exist in 2021 in Ealing, and that families in our borough are still struggling to afford food. This is the reality of over a decade of austerity and cuts to public services under Conservative prime ministers.

We pledge to continue to do everything we can to support anyone struggling in Ealing, and to eradicate food poverty.

 

Reports from Officers
11

Councillors Mason, Stafford and Malcolm paid tribute to Paul Najsarek and thanked him for his service as Chief Executive.

RESOLVED: That

  1. Council notes with thanks the service of Paul Najsarek as Chief Executive (head of paid service), who has announced his departure from the Council.

  2. Council agrees to appoint the recommended interim to the position of interim head of paid service of this council, in accordance with the unanimous recommendations of the appointments panel held on 26th November 2021 as set out in paragraphs 3.1. and 3.2. of this report, this appointment to take effect (subject to the usual required checks) from on or about 1st February 2022.

  3. Delegated authority is granted to the Director of Human Resources & Organisational Development, in consultation with the Leader to agree the precise details of the first day of service for the interim head of paid service.

  4. Council notes that for the period of office the interim head of paid service will be the returning officer and electoral registration officer for any constituency in the borough.

  5. Council agrees to appoint Helen Harris, the council’s Director of Legal and Democratic Services, to be the returning officer and electoral registration officer for any constituency in the borough from 18th December 2021 until the appointment of the interim head of paid service.

  6. Council agrees to appoint Judith Finlay (the council’s Executive Director of Children, Adults and Public Health) to be acting head of paid service from 18th December 2021 until 1st February 2022 or until such time the interim joins the council.

  7. Council agrees to Judith Finlay as acting head of paid service and the Director of Human Resources & Organisational Development, in consultation with the Leader, delegates the roles and 
    responsibilities from the Executive Director of Children, Adults and Public Health post to other members of Ealing Directors Team. This will include the statutory Director of Children’s Services role. This will be for the period from 18th December 2021 until 1st February 2022 or until such time the interim joins the council.

 

14 Appointments to Committees and Other Bodies

The following appointments to Committees are proposed:

Councillor Stafford to replace Councillor Kumar on the Council and Trade Union Joint Committee.

 

15

RESOLVED: That Councillor Stafford replaces Councillor Kumar on the Council and Trade Union Joint Committee.

 

15 Urgent key decisions exempted from call-in

The following key decisions have been exempted from call-in since the last meeting of council:

Contract Variation and Extension for the London Sexual Health E-service contract between Preventx and the City of London.  Reasons for urgency :

The contract for the London Sexual Health e-service was managed by the City of London on behalf of 30 London Councils, as part of the London Sexual Health Commissioning collaborative. City officers had highlighted the potential risk to other London councils and the overall London Sexual Health Programme: ‘Any authority abstaining from this key decision increases the risk that the contract is terminated in its entirety on August 15, 2022’

 

The London e-service managed board had recommended a contract extension to ensure service continuity and to support the wider sexual health system

All Councils were requested to vote before, or at, an extraordinary London  E Service Management Meeting on Tuesday 19 October, 2021

As part of the ONWL sub-region Brent and Harrow Councils had indicated their agreement to the contract extension, Ealing Council had been requested to co-ordinate the ONWL sub-regional response

London Collective Investment Vehicle - Amendments to Shareholder Agreement and Articles of Association 

Reasons for urgency:

The reason for urgency was that if the London CIV did not receive a 75% majority 40 days after the resolution was issued or the resolution would lapse and Ealing Council would need to reissue the resolution to all shareholders (including those who had already signed).  That deadline would expire this Friday (26th November 2021).

16

RESOLVED: That the urgent key decisions exempted from call-in be noted.

 

16 Date of Next Meeting

The next meeting will be held on 1 March 2022.

 


17

The next meeting was scheduled to take place on 2 March 2022.

 

Declarations of Interests

Member NameItem Ref.DetailsNature of DeclarationAction
No declarations of interest have been entered for this meeting.

Visitors

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